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Bulletin

Bulletin 3 2012 Marri Canker
Bulletin 3 2012 Marri Canker (3.9 MB)
Identifying marri canker disease
A severe canker disease has been contributing to decline in
marri (Corymbia calophylla) for some years now. The fungal pathogen Quambalaria coyrecup has been identified as the causal agent and is thought to be a native pathogen. It is sometimes difficult to make a correct diagnosis, however there are some key symptoms to look for.

Bulletin

2012 Bulletin No. 2 Honey possums
2012 Bulletin 2 Honey possum diet (4.5 MB)
Honey possum diets in banksia heathland infested with Phytophthora cinnamomi
An investigation of honey possum diet was conducted in the Cape Riche area to compare their menu with plant susceptibility to Phytophthora cinnamomi.

Bulletin

2012 Bulletin No. 1 PPunCC Model
2012 Bulletin 1 PPunCC Model_LR.pdf (4.4 MB)
Plant migration and persistence under climate change in fragmented landscapes.
As climate changes, some plant species will start to die out in areas where climate becomes unsuited for them. Whilst individual plants cannot move to new areas, a species can establish new colonies via seed dispersal. Which species will be able to move fast enough, and which will lag behind? Can we do anything to help them? The answer to these questions can be provided by PPunCC.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 19 Managing habitat for endangered species.
Bulletin 19 (Carnaby)_LR.pdf (693.1 KB)
Carnaby's black-cockatoo, food resources and time since last fire.
Habitat loss is often the primary factor contributing to a decline in the range or abundance of threatened species. Management of threatened or endangered species is often focused on acquisition of remnant habitat, with little focus on habitat quality, in terms of resource provisioning.
We investigated the influence of time since last fire on food resources in banksia woodlands for the endangered Carnaby's black-cockatoo.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 18 Inoculations and revegetation success
Bulletin 18 (Innoculations)_LR.pdf (591.1 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Can we increase revegetation success?
Reforestation of degraded lands can be difficult and expensive. The production and planting of nursery raised seedlings, especially, requires substantial labour and funds. Priming seeds with beneficial organisms and other treatments may be useful in this regard.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 17 Restoration timetables
Bulletin 17 (Restoration timetable)_LR.pdf (614.6 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Restoration timetables: keeping on track for success
I have often noted that restoration practitioners are very particular about most details regarding restoration or revegetation, such as what species they are focusing on, densities of planting or seeding, seed provenance and site preparation. However, even with this attention to detail, the planting season is often still stressful and things get done 'on the fly' and at the last minute.

However, there are many activities one can accomplish prior to the beginning of planting season to ensure that the whole process runs more smoothly. To assist with this, I use a simple Gantt chart showing the revegetation project schedule.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 16
CoE Bulletin no.16_LR.pdf (682.3 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Marri flowering threatened by introduced pathogen
Over recent years, the declining health of marri (Corymbia calophylla) in southwest WA has been an increasing source of concern. These trees provide important flowering resources and the damage to flowers is likely to cause substantial losses of foraging resources for native fauna as well as honeybees.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 15
CoE Bulletin no.15_LR.pdf (645.4 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Can a microscopic plant pathogen kill a large tuart tree?
Since the 1990s, tuart (Eucalyptus gomphocephala) have been suffering a significant decline in Yalgorup National Park, approximately 100km south of Perth Western Australia, with symptoms ranging from chronic deterioration to sudden mass collapse.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 14
CoE Bulletin no.14_LR.pdf (652.5 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Tree water relations in a drying climate
Mean annual rainfall in Australia's southwest has decreased dramatically during the last few decades and this trend is predicted to conti nue under current climate change scenarios. 2010 was the driest year on record in southwest WA, and was followed by one of the hottest summers ever. These extreme events have caused severe crown decline in jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) in many places. Our research targets the dynamics of water relations in jarrah trees and other important woody species of the jarrah forest.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 13
CoE Bulletin no.13_LR.pdf (653.4 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Is Eucalyptus wandoo health aff ected by climate change?
Southwest Western Australia (WA), known for its high biodiversity, has experienced a decline in rainfall since the early 1960s, and the projections are unanimous that this trend will continue. This trend, together with the global increases in temperature and more frequent extreme weather events like drought, is having an increasingly negative impact on the health of the diverse forest ecosystems in this region.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 12
CoE Bulletin no.12_LR.pdf (610.3 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Understanding restorati on volunteering in a context of environmental change
A range of human activities have left their impact on the landscape of southwest WA, including - but not restricted to - climate change. Various experts have argued that it is impossible to return these already drastically altered ecosystems to what they once were, and that future climatic changes may render such historical landscapes obsolete. However, it has also been suggested that society expects a return to particular (historical) ecosystem states.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 11
CoE Bulletin no.11_LR.pdf (626.2 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Impact of tuart canopy decline on brushtail possums
Since the early 1990s, there has been a noticeable decline of the health of tuart (Eucalyptus gomphocephala) in Yalgorup National Park in Western Australia. The exact reason for the decline is unknown although there have been multiple theories put forward such as land clearing for agricultural and urban development, decreased rainfall and pathogens such as native cankers and Phytophthora spp. Although some of the tuart trees are recovering from the decline, the change to vegetation structure in the tuart forest has been extreme.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 10
CoE Bulletin no.10_LR.pdf (663 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Is tree health a determinant of reptile species richness and abundance?
Large portions of the world's forests and woodlands are currently affected by declining tree health, however the effects of these tree declines on fauna communities is largely unknown.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 09
CoE Bulletin no.9_LR.pdf (588.5 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Look before you plant: the use of smoke water to test the soil seedbank
Land managers are often faced with a high degree of uncertainty regarding the level of weed species in the existing soil seedbank. This can make strategic land management planning difficult. If the soil seed bank could be analysed, it may be used as a predictive tool for land managers.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 08
CoE Bulletin no.8_LR.pdf (653.6 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Revegetating harsh environments: lime and cement kiln dust residue areas
Revegetating some landscapes may be more challenging than others. Previous land use may dramatically affect soil composition and structure, which can influence survival and growth of vegetation planted at these sites. These landscapes may often require a tailored approach to revegetation, which takes these factors into account.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 07
CoE Bulletin no.7_LR.pdf (600.1 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Testing techniques for promoting revegetation: mimicking the effects of fire
Marlee Reserve is a major area of remnant woodland in the Mandurah area. This 48ha reserve encompasses beautiful Eucalyptus-Banksia woodland with high conservation, social, and educational values. However, a number of areas are degraded. Revegetation is one way of assisting recovery in these degraded areas. In a drying climate, however, merely planting seedlings may not be sufficient to ensure vegetation recovery. Therefore new methods to increase the success of revegetation need to be found.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 06
CoE Bulletin no.6_LR.pdf (683 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Overcoming challenges to restoration
Since European settlement, large areas of Australia have been degraded by various anthropogenic disturbances. This large-scale degradation has lead to a growing desire from the community, conservationists, scientists and land managers to develop techniques to restore these areas. However, restoration faces a range of ecological, economic and social challenges which need to be overcome to ensure restoration projects are successful in the long term.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 05
CoE Bulletin no.5_LR.pdf (705 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Impact of Phytophthora dieback on reptiles in banksia woodlands
Phytophthora cinnamomi is a soil-borne water mould (Class Oomycetes) that is listed by the IUCN Species Survival Commission as one of the world's 100 most devastating invading species. Consequences of Phytophthora infestation include loss of susceptible plant species, reduction in primary productivity and biomass and changes to habitat structure.
These changes in floristic communities and vegetation structure are likely to have consequences for fauna.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 04
CoE Bulletin no.4_LR.pdf (638.6 KB)
Research Findings 2011:Tree crown deaths over winter 2010: the effects of frost on marri and jarrah
In July 2010, scientists and community became aware of alarming changes to tree crown health within pockets of marri (Corymbia calophylla) and jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata)-dominated forest. Severe shoot and foliage mortality was reported throughout large porti ons of the north-western jarrah forest, with marri suffering foliage dieback on the crown periphery and jarrah leaves first turning distinctly purple in colour prior to dying and shedding.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 03
CoE Bulletin no.3_LR.pdf (680.1 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Role of Australian digging mammals in ecosystem health
Mammals that move or manipulate soil for food or to create shelter can completely change the biotic and abiotic characteristics of their habitat, potentially creating multiple benefits to the overall health of the ecosystem. The main digging mammals within Australia, bandicoots and bettongs, create small, conical-shaped holes while foraging for underground fungi, earthworms and tubers. The majority of Australian digging mammals have undergone drastic range and populati on contractions within the last 100 years. Where ecosystems have lost digging mammals, key processes may be reduced and this may contribute to declines in ecosystem health. Our project will investigate the ecological impacts of mammal foraging pits on soil condition, water infiltration, seedling recruitment, fungi dispersal and fire dynamics.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 02
CoE Bulletin no.2_LR.pdf (696 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Using 'nature's kidneys' to treat alkaline waste water
Constructed wetlands are surface or subsurface water bodies designed to include a series of physical, chemical and biological processes which recycle wastewater. However, in addition to minimising the environmental footprint and improving aesthetics of the industrial landscape, constructed wetlands and their surroundings also provide a economic, social and environmental benefits and services, including habitat for a wide range of animals and a place for people to enjoy and connect with their environment.

Bulletin

Bulletin No. 01
CoE Bulletin No. 01 (612.9 KB)
Research Findings 2011: Is this little animal losing its home?
Environmental changes such as reduced vegetation cover and altered plant species composition can have serious consequences for ecosystems, and can lead to the extinction of animal species.

 

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